Attentive Listener Seminar Set Oct. 21

2013 SPIRITUAL CARE SEMINARS: Attentive Listener Seminar Set Oct. 21

The Rev. John Harrison will speak on Attentive Listening

The Rev. John Harrison will speak on Attentive Listening

How do you listen – really listen – to another person?

How do you hear – really hear – someone who is hurting or afraid or just feeling very much alone? Being able to “just listen” can be one of the most difficult tasks a Spiritual Care volunteer, nurse or clergyperson undertakes.

“So many of us want to help someone who is in pain that we try to step in and help them solve their problems,” El Camino Chaplain and Director of Spiritual Care the Rev. John Harrison said. “We are there to attentively listen to their hopes, fears, dreams and needs – not to fix them.

Learning how to be an “Attentive Listener” is the topic of the next Spiritual Care Seminar.

Please advise Chaplain Tom Jackson by Oct. 18 if you will join us at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 21 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

Who:     Spiritual Care volunteers, hospital volunteers, hospital staff and area clergy.

When:  Oct. 21, 2013 @ 1:30 PM

Where: Los Gatos Conference Room 2, El Camino Hospital Los Gatos, 815 Pollard Road, Los Gatos, CA 95032

How to Conduct Guided Meditation Sessions

Patricia Wood

Patricia Wood

Guided meditation is an intentional, focused meditation technique that is very useful for achieving a specific purpose, such as deep relaxation, behavior modification, or releasing negative emotions and self-limiting beliefs.

We will learn about appropriate ways and times to offer guided meditation to patients and we will practice preparing and leading a session for each other.

Patricia Wood is an Interfaith Spiritual Care Volunteer with El Camino Hospital Los Gatos and the Chair and Spiritual Care Coordinator of Mountain Neighbors Helping Neighbors in her rural mountain community above Los Gatos. She is also an authorized minister of the United Church of Christ in covenant with Skyland Community Church, UCC. After a 25 year career in hi-tech, she returned to graduate school to pursue her Master of Divinity in spirituality and the arts, and fulfill a lifelong calling to love and serve her neighbors. Patricia’s experience with meditation and healing arts has its roots in her own path of healing and her mother’s career as a nurse. Her faithful life companions include her husband, Brian, and Bunny, a dedicated lap cat. Please let Chaplain Tom Jackson (408.866.3860) know by Sept. 18 if you will join us at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 23 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

 

Who:                   Spiritual Care volunteers, hospital volunteers, hospital staff and area clergy.

When:                 Sept. 23, 2013 @ 1:30 PM

Where:                Los Gatos Conference Room 2

Fall Spiritual Care Seminars set on Los Gatos Hospital Campus

Here’s our current list of Spiritual Care Seminars for the fall – please mark them on your calendar and join us. All seminars start at 1:30 p.m. in Conference Room 2 and run for about an hour. All seminars (expect in September) are on the third Monday of the month.

• September 23: How to Conduct A Guided Meditation by Patricia Wood
• October 21: Attentive Listening by Chaplain John Harrison
• November 18: Making and using Prayer Beads by Eleanor Wiley
• December 16: A presentation introducing the benefit(s) of therapy dogs Carole Hughes

The Art of Active Listening

Chaplain Charlotte Bear

Chaplain Charlotte Bear

Chaplin Charlotte Bear of VITAS Innovative Hospice Care helped us learn the “Art of Active Listening” during an hour-long Spiritual Care Seminar  Monday, June 17, in Los Gatos Conference Room 2. Here is some of what she said;

Too often patients and families report that what mattered most to them was feeling seen, heard, understood and respected. Too often disappointments and conflicts arise from the absence of these feelings. Active listening is one way we can avoid a failure in communication that leaves people feeling angry.

Active Listening is a critical communication skill in any kind of spiritual care, especially when people are vulnerable. This training defines the process of effective communication, discusses active listening and its components, explains the value of verbal and non-verbal communication and clarifies helpful and not so helpful responses to a patient or family’s personal story.

Chaplain Bear brings spiritual, military, educational and healthcare experience to her work as an educator and trainer with VITAS Hospice Care. She is an ordained minister of the United Methodist Church and a veteran of the U.S. Army.

Difficult Patient Discussions: Whose Problem Is It?

Dr. William Buchholz Dr. William Buchholz explored the art and science of having difficult conversations with patients and their families during our May 13 Los Gatos Hospital Spiritual Care Seminar.

After asking “Who is this conversation difficult for?” he suggested  talking honestly about end of life decisions is hard on a physician,  patient and chaplain.  But sometimes patients want – and need – to know the truth, he added.

Reaching into his experience as an Oncologist, Dr.  Buchholz told of a patient whose unshakeable optimism obscured her ability to recognize growing signs that her cancer had returned and would soon end her life.  One day she asked Dr. Buchholz “What is going on?”

“Do you really want to know?” he replied. “Yes,” she an answered. The doctor then explained  by linking her  symptoms and treatments to the extent of the cancer’s return.  “Why didn’t anyone tell me?” she finally asked.  The next day, he added, his patient said she was angry with him for telling her bad news. “But you asked me to tell you and I had to tell you the truth,” he replied. Read more of this post

Difficult Patient Discussions: Whose Problem Is It?

William Buchholz, MDSometimes we face a difficult discussion with a patient who has just heard distressing news, is in pain, or is confronting their own mortality. Dr. William Buchholz will share his thoughts on how we should carry out these difficult conversations during an hour-long Spiritual Care Seminar starting at 1:30 p.m. Monday, May 13 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

Dr. Buchholz is an Oncologist (cancer specialist) and Hematologist (blood specialist). He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard in psychology and philosophy and his medical degree from Stanford. Since 1978 he has been in practice in Los Altos and Mountain View.

He is a consultant to the Center for Healing and Wellness (formerly Cancer Support and Education Center) since its beginning in 1982, to the Commonweal Cancer Help Program in Bolinas, and to many Hospices, home health agencies and nursing homes in the Bay Area. He has published widely in both medical journals and the lay press. He is an internationally recognized speaker on topics including cancer and psycho-oncology, cancer survivorship, complementary medicine, wellness and stress reduction, pain control and hospice.

Please let Chaplain Tom Jackson (408.866.3860) know by May 8 if you will join us at 1:30 p.m. May 13 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

Who:           Spiritual Care volunteers, hospital volunteers, hospital staff and area clergy.

When:         May 13, 2013 @ 1:30 PM

Where:       Los Gatos Conference Room 2

Special Seminar: What’s it like to almost die in the ICU?

Daniel D. Shin, MD Daniel D. Shin, MD was a Stanford post-doctoral fellow in infectious diseases when he became ill with meningitis. He awoke six weeks later in Stanford’s ICU. He had been through three abdominal surgeries and was paralyzed from the waist down. His wife and family were told he may not survive or ever work again.

This is a narrative of what it’s like to almost die and then return to work at the hospital you never wanted to see again. Hopefully, it will improve your communication with patients in the ICU and demystify the way patients experience the ICU.

Daniel Shin, MD, is an infectious diseases physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation and El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, CA. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCSF. Since 2001, he has presented this talk at over 40 conferences and medical centers. Please let Chaplain Tom Jackson (408.866.3860) know by April 10 if you will join us at 1:30 p.m. April 15 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

For:                Spiritual Care volunteers, hospital volunteers, hospital staff and area clergy.

When:                 April 15, 2013 @ 1:30 PM

Where:                Los Gatos Conference Room 2

Living History program introduced to Los Gatos volunteers

Chaplain Maryellen Garnier advises Los Gatos volunteers on Living History Program

Chaplain Maryellen Garnier advises Los Gatos volunteers on Living History Program

Mountain View Chaplain The Rev. Maryellen Garnier (at left)  introduced a diverse group of volunteers to the Living History Program© as practiced on our Mountain View campus during December’s Spiritual Care Seminar in Los Gatos.

“We are looking for ways to bring this innovation service to our patients here,” Los Gatos Chaplain The Rev. Thomas C. Jackson said. “We’ll be looking for a team of between four and six people who are willing to serve as needed on one day a week.”
Through the Living History Program©, patients create their own personal “living history” which serves as an introduction for those caring for the patient. Each history is compiled by a specially trained volunteer.

After approval by a patient, a copy of the history is placed in their medical record. We will also make copies of the history for the patient to give to their family. If you want to help please contact Chaplain Tom Jackson.

When you can no longer speak for yourself: A briefing on Advance Health Care Directives

When you can no longer speak for yourself: A briefing on Advance Health Care Directives

2013 Spiritual Care Seminar: Jan. 14, 2013, 1:30 PM
@ Los Gatos Conference Room 2

Please join us at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2 as Betsy Carpenter, El Camino Hospital’s counselor for Advance Directives at the Health Resource Center, briefs us on Advance Directives.

betsy carpneter

Our January speaker is Betsy Carpenter

“Our goal is to help Spiritual Care volunteers understand the process used here for completing Advance Directives as well as some of the questions that arise as people consider making an Advance Directive,” Betsy explains.

When a patient can no longer speak for themself about their medical care, an Advance Directive can help:

  • avoid some of the anguish a family faces in making decisions for them;
  • make things go more smoothly for their care-givers; and 
  • enhance understanding of their personal values by decision makers and doctors.

Betsy Carpenter will show you us how a well-crafted Advance Directive can do each of these things. She will also describe a patient’s rights which include: a right to say “yes” to procedures they want; and to say “no” to those they do not want.

Please let Chaplain Tom Jackson know by Jan. 10 if you will join us at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 14 in Los Gatos Conference Room 2.

 

This seminar is open to Spiritual Care volunteers, hospital volunteers, and area clergy.